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Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)
of martin luther king and abraham lincoln. this is martin luther king day. we celebrate that, as well. the second time a president has been inaugurated on martin luther king day. about 800,000 people will be there on the mall. a little bit smaller than four years ago. but no less buoyant. a lot of smiling faces out there. we hear the choir of p.s. 22 in staten island. >> they are the largest choir in staten island. and i believe they are fifth graders. let's listen to them for a second. ♪ don't pay no mind to the feeling, until you feel it ♪ >> we love the caps. we love the swaying this morning. we've been thinking to ourselves, a second inauguration is typically not as -- not as surprising as the first inauguration. but nonetheless, it rededicates this country to big ideas. and the person who has to do it in his speech, walking up to the podium, is the president. we saw the first family walking in to st. john's church earlier this morning. >> they're at that worship service right now. there they are, right there, just before they walked into st. john's episcopal church, across th
address in history is the second inaugural address which is lincoln which some people say surpasses the gettysburg address. it's the best lay sermon no history. >> and dr. jill bide ep is accompanied by honey alexander, the wife of senator lamar alexander. and by debby boehner, wife of house speaker john boehner. sorry to interrupt you there. >> more recently, you may disagree with the content and the tone but no one will dispute the fact that george w. bush was aiming for the bleachers with his second inaugural with what he called his freedom speech which is -- in terms of projecting american force, moral and military around the world in the wake of 9/11 and the doctrine of preemptive military action. >> you knows the reference to lincoln, we talk about being in a divided america now. in many ways we are politically. but you think about lincoln and that inauguration, both of his, it was a different level. >> different level all together. he is involved in the conflict where half a million people would be killed, the end of channeled slavery. a lot is at stake. we're fighting now bu
of texas. he can rise above everyday politics and speak to history. lincoln did in the 1865, f.d.r. in 1937, now it's obama's chance." did he do that? >> yeah, i think he did it pretty well. this wasn't lincoln 1865 but we haven't had one since. the closest was roosevelt 1937. we're not likely to see that, charlie. i thought he did whatrand said he should do. i appreciate what mark is saying but i think this is not a programmatic speech. this is not a speech where you talk about here's my four-point jobs program. it's a speech about vision and i thought he gave a good sense of where he wanted the country to be i think it clearly was a progressive democratic speech. in f you read reagan's in 1985 it was a conservative republican speech. and a as for those who say -- i watched fox news who say he didn't offer olive branches or reach across the table to try to encourage birtisanship, i would note 16 years ago bill clinton in his second inaugural said that you have sent a democratic president and a republican congress back to washington, you didn't send us back to engage in bickering and partis
by chance. when lincoln creates -- lincoln creates some really great was but one of the first words he thought about secession. he said that secession is the sugar coating, the impact of this country. lincoln when he first used sugarcoated, the printers of the united states comes to lincoln and said we cannot put this in the official record, the word sugarcoated. and lincoln says i can't imagine any american not knowing what you're saying. lincoln was also, again i'm going back to william safire's influence, one of the first uses of cool, not innocent of temperature but in the sense of being callous, he said, something he said that was cool. that was callous. it was a behavioral thing. so again, those are, a word like cool. obama could come up with a new name of cool. that's another thing. one word and you give it different many. as i said with all these different meanings. and how i did this was i did a lot of reading and i get a lot of use of huge proprietary databases at the library of congress. 19th century database where you can find the original document in which 1807 when jeffer
: and abraham lincoln's, delivered to a nation divided by civil war. >> with malice toward none, with charity for all. >> reporter: a third theme, renewing our commitment to the values of our founding fathers. perhaps it's surprising the president found inspiration in the words of this former a adversa adversary. >> there can be no human rights without human liberty. >> reporter: aides tell us that, although the president disagrees with mr. bush's policy, he's moved by the speech's democratic principles. >> freedom by its nature must be chosen and defended by citizens. >> reporter: a message, aides say, the president will echo today, as he did at the white house last week. >> that most fundamental set of rights, to life and liberty and the pursuit of happiness. those rights are at stake. we're responsible. >> reporter: of all his predecessors, the president says he is most inspired by president lincoln. >> that government of the people, by the people, for the people shall not perish from the earth. >> reporter: in november, mr. obama screened steven spielberg's movie "lincoln" at the white ho
to president lincoln and dr. king president obama wants to remind the nation of its traditions. >> the inauguration reminds us of the role that we have as fellow citizens in promoting a common good. >> reporter: now today is a day of service in honor of dr. king. monday, the swearing in, the celebration, and then when the party's over after the inaugural balls on monday night, it will be back to the same battles and the hope that it won't be just business as usual. rebecca, anthony? >> bill plante at the white house. thank you, bill. >>> while the president's opponents are observing the traditional truths to the inauguration, can president obama hope for a new term. let's talk with debbie wassermann schultz. >> good morning. thanks for having me. >> congresswoman, let me ask you. we heard from theepublicans on extending the debt ceiling for at least a three-month period. is this any signs of hope in terms of cooperation or more maneuvering? >> i think this unfortunately more a sign that republicans realize it was horribly damaging to them to continue to
spoke them. abraham lincoln with malice toward none, charity for all, let us strive to finish the work we are in to bind up the nation's wounds. john f. kennedy asked not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country. franklin roosevelt, let me assert my firm believe that the only thing we have to fear is fear it itself. >> what makes a speech a part of history and what does this president need to say tomorrow as he begins his second term joining us are michael gerson speechwriter for president bush and james fallis, speechwriter to president carter. you say you don't write to be etched in granite, but i know that writers know when words ring. when you put words on paper, you think, i can see this, you know, as being what will be taken from this speech. so how do you craft those? >> it's true. the chair richter version is the state of the union address. i think with the inaugural address it's harder because something that registers as a showy line may come off as too showy. i think my sense of inaugural addresses the more they are poem like, the more they are s
one. >> of course, there was lincoln's second inaugural where he talked about the wounds of the nation. we know that the president has been working on this president for weeks and major garrett, our chief white house correspondent, is at the white house this morning with a little bit of insight on what we might hear today. >> well, good morning, scott. those closest to the president tell us this speech is in the moment and it's going to talk, they hope, credibly, believably about responsibilities ahead. and the prospect for not only bipartisan compromise, and things that didn't seem achievable four years ago. it might be worth reminding us ourselves how the president ended first inaugural address four years ago. scott, the president talked about america being in the midst of a winter of our hardship and he urged the nation to brave icy currents and to endure whatever storms may come. there was a sense of forboding then, a sense of crisis, both economic and otherwise, that white house advisers that he feels is no longer as present now as it was then. so that's part of the optimistic not
lincoln. when harry truman was worrying about firing mcarthur, he's reading about mcclellan, what did lincoln do about mcclellan. you think about your own life, learn from your own experiences. he will have learned from this fist term an enormous set of things to take with him to the second term, strengthed and weaknesses. but you can learn from all these guys before you, like learning from your grandparents and great grandparents. great when a president cares about history. >> give me a measure, michael, of how much this president is attuned to history, how much it plays a part of his lady life. i know i've read he tries to find up to three hours a day and night between 9:00 and midnight to read. >> he is above all a writer, so not surprising given what this is his day job is. but, you know, i think the most revealing thing was just after the election he gave that press conference and was asked about second terms. you remember? he said i am very familiar with the literature on second-term overreach. we both loved lyndon johnson. i don't think he ever read two words on second-term ove
20 years, it probably isn't. it may happen by chance. when lincoln creates a really interesting words, one of the words he first uses he's talking about secession. he said the secessionist sugarcoating the impact on this country. the printer of the united states comes to lincoln and says we cannot put this in the official record. lincoln said i can't imagine any american not knowing. again, going back to william safire's influence on his, one of the first uses of cool, not in the sensor temperature, but the sense of being callous coming he said that was cool. i was a behavioral thing. so again, obama could come up with a new meaning of cool. one word and you give. how i did this quiz i did a lot of reading and i did a lot of use of huge proprietary databases at the library on price. nineteenth century databases for you can find the original document in which 1807, when jefferson raised to danbury baptists and comes up with this race and the separation of church and state, which is not in the dictation. first articulated in this letter to danbury baptists preach everything. a lot of it
goodwin later on. what is the chance he doesn't quote lincoln's second inaugural? >> i would be shocked if lincoln is not quoted. i would be shocked if specific issues aren't mentioned. that doesn't mean he isn't going to talk about newtown. but as far as talking about guns and gun control, he's got a state of the union in three weeks. advisers continue to remind us of that. hey, this is not a laundry list of things he wants to get done. yes, he has a small window. i think savannah is right, i think we'll be able to judge by the fourth of july of this year, has he gotten one of his gun proposals passed through congress, is immigration done? all of those things, if he can get them done, probably need to get done by the summer. but today's speech knot for that. that's that state of the union which takes place in three weeks. >> all right. chuck todd in front of reviewing stand. we want to show you, especially those just joining us the kind of calendar of events, the schedule upcoming. right now, the president is hosting congressional leaders inside the white house for a kind of traditiona
discrimination a crime. it was a very, very -- probably the most important advance since lincoln signed the emancipation proclaimation, and during that year, if johnson was mr. inside, and some outside, because he gave some inspirational speeches -- king kept the pressure on. whenever he thought that the congress was going to falter, that they couldn't beat a southern filibuster, king went to jail, and he refused to let people forget what this was all about. i'd like to concentrate on one particular period, because we have an anniversary coming up today, and i think looking at johnson and king during the struggle over the voting rights act in 1965, illustrates as well as anything the brilliance of both these men, the difficulty of their task, and their multidimensional leadership. the most important aspect of -- one of the most important aspects of which was the uncanny ability of both johnson and king to seize opportunity. they knew when to strike. on january 15, 1965, president johnson called martin luther king to congratulate him on his 36th birthday. listen to a little bit of what t
and bill clinton. lincoln as its successful -- special case and that his second term was so brief. the it is interesting to note that only the president who had a more successful second term than their first was james madison and andrew jackson. the following is an accounting of the presidents elected to a second term, and the reasons for those that have experienced failed or troubled second terms. for failed because of a war that seemed unwinnable, or for lack of preparedness. jefferson, truman, johnson and bush were the four. also, for failed because of economic crisis for failure to act to deter such a crisis. these were jefferson, cleveland, coolidge, franklin roosevelt from the 37 downturn, and george bush. at failed due to their inability to lead congress were jefferson, monroe, grants, wilson, truman, johnson, nixon and bush. to failed due to hubris, franklin roosevelt, and richard nixon are the four who did not effectively communicate their agendas or initiatives were jefferson, monroe, grant in cleveland. obviously, the dominant source of failure for second term president
crisis. we talked about abraham lincoln's second inaugural while the civil war was still going on. we talk about f.d.r.'s "we have nothing to fear." the great depression was on and unemployment with such staggeringly high numbers so this is a time where people have felt improvement since president obama came? we have to remember the crash of the economy stock market in such terrible shape. it's been a progressive incrementalism. but i have to say this speech is part of a progressive tradition of a theodore roosevelt speech in kansas where barack obama in 1911 when -- in 2011 he went and if you read the t.r. speech "the new nationalism" you'll find hit in the speech he gave today. you'll find it at f.d.r.'s second inaugural and in many of martin luther king's speeches. people talk about kennedy's inaugural about swords and switchbacks. it's a technique that worked brilliantly for john f. kennedy but i think the president had caught the aura of dr. king today quite well. >> pelley: and this day being inauguration day and martin luther king day all at the same time. doug, thanks very muc
-- was a terrible -- he's kind of like lincoln in a way -- are you for slavery or are you not? because he's trying to keep the border states in line. he was terrified that if he ceded the black delegation that the white democrats from kentucky and tennessee and the other border states would walk out, and that's what -- he was pretending that he didn't have anything to do with it, but he was consumed by no other issue, and putting that together is an amazing story -- or chapter, i think, in our american history about the sensitivity of this issue at this time. c-span: but when he came up to the white house, he didn't have a meeting scheduled with lyndon johnson and he was supposed to meet with hubert humphrey. >> guest: right. c-span: and there was a lot of maneuvering around. >> guest: i'm sorry. you're talking about -- this is at selma. this is at sali in february of 1965. dr. king can out of jail in sali and announced in depression, he came out of jail and his aides said you can't just come out of jail. you have to have a purpose for coming out of jail. and he said i'm tired. i'm depressed. i've
to his in-laws, the bible used by abraham lincoln, the bible that dr. martin luther king carried with him during his travels and rosa parks' bible that she owned as a civil rights activist? >> rosa parks. >> yes. you're right. you're right. >> wow. congratulations. okay. so that's the one that won't be, but the other three will. >> he is using the in-laws' family bible in a small ceremony on monday. then in the public one on monday he's stacking the lincoln and martin luther king jr. bibles. >> let's go back across to kath. we have kim kardashian with us, and it's her birthday from los angeles. who was the first president to be sworn in by a woman? president lyndon johnson, john kennedy, bill clinton, or george w. bush? >> bill clinton? [ buzzer ] >> you're a winner too. >> yes, you are. >> all right, kim kardashian gets my book. so the correct answer here, president lyndon johnson. >> lyndon johnson. you might remember that famous, famous picture on air force one after president kennedy was assassinated. he was sworn in by a dallas judge, sarah hughes. >> okay. well, thank you so much. t
with his eloquence. and then, beyond the reflecting pool, the dignified columns of the lincoln memorial. whoever would understand in his heart the meaning of america will find it in the life of abraham lincoln. beyond those monuments to heroism is the potomac river, and on the far shore the sloping hills of arlington national cemetery, with its row upon row of simple white markers bearing crosses or stars of david. they add up to only a tiny fraction of the price that has been paid for our freedom. each one of those markers is a monument to the kind of hero i spoke of earlier. their lives ended in places called belleau wood, the argonne, omaha beach, salerno, and halfway around the world on guadalcanal, tarawa, pork chop hill, the chosin reservoir, and in a hundred rice paddies and jungles of a place called vietnam. under one such marker lies a young man, martin treptow, who left his job in a small town barbershop in 1917 to go to france with the famed rainbow division. there, on the western front, he was killed trying to carry a message between battalions under heavy artillery fire. we
"lincoln." >> state dinners. >> the majority leader's office called later and said, yeah, we got the invitation that afternoon, four hours beforehand. but you invite congressmen and senators over, one on one, they'll come. >> there is an upside to cooperation. not every battle is one of opposition. begin to reframe the image of the party with the rest of the country, number one. at the end of the day, that's what people want to see, you working with the administration. to joe's point, you don't have to agree with everything, but you can at least stand there and show that we're trying to make the effort. so when you have the noise come out about, well, we want to block him at every turn, that plays on the psyche of the american people. >> mike, what'ses in it f in it republicans? well, the republicans' backs are against the wall. they owned the house of representatives. they have a midterm election in 2014. for those republicans saying, oh, well, we always win midterm electio elections, no, you don't. two elections ago, we get routed by nancy pelosi. >> let's get to a break. we ha
to president lincoln which the president used four years ago when he was sworn in. but he'll also be bringing a bible that belonged to the rev. martin luther king jr that's fitting because the ceremony takes place on martin luther king jr.'s day. the president will be surrounded by his family and his friends. some of the best seats in the house will go to invited guests of the president. the supreme court justices, the joint chiefs of staff. congressional leaders. and i'll tell you who else has a great seat tomorrow, scott. that's the brooklyn tabernacle choir. you'll see them up in those bleachers just above where the swearing-in is taking place. they're up there right now because they rehearsed earlier today. now they're just taking in the great view watching james taylor rehearse who was out here just a few minutes ago and sounded wonderful. he's singing "america the beautiful." scott >> pelley: nancy, thank you very much. as we prepare to say good-bye to you this morning let's have one more look at the swearing-in of the president in the blue room of the white house that took place just m
the country had reached a higher degree of comfort and security than at any time in history. oops! but lincoln got it so right, his with malice towards none, charity for all, was more than a speech. it was a life guide. yet, no more powerful than roosevelt's "the only thing we have to fear is fear itself." and no less inspiring than kennedy's "ask not what your country can do for you. but what you can do for your country." as the nation was dividing into political parties, jefferson wander, "we are all republicans. we are all federalists." still, so true. and it was the first george bush who looked out at the crowd and said, "we meet on democracy's front porch on a day when our nation is made whole, when our differences for a moment are suspended." just think, if we could keep that feeling going for a while, who knows what great things might still be done. back in a moment. [ male announcer ] you are a busin omnipotent of opportunity. you know how to mix business... with business. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle. and go. you can even tak
, today looking at the lincoln memorial. live here on c-span. the lincoln memorial in washington. up the steps, kids from the fifth grade from watkins elementary school in washington will read the entire speech from martin luther king jr.'s "i have a dream"speech . we are streaming all of our coverage today. president obama begins his second term. sunday is the official swearing- in ceremony at the white house, and our coverage will include your phone calls, and we look back at the president's 2009 inaugural address at 10:30 eastern. on monday, the public inaugural ceremonies at the capitol. we will have live all-day coverage monday beginning at 7:00 and the eastern, c-span, c- span radio, and c-span.org. coming up, a discussion on the safety of the u.s.-mexican border and how immigration is being affected. we will hear from remarks from a homeland assistant secretary in new mexico. that is coming up at 4:15 eastern on c-span. tonight, we will show you inaugural speeches from the last 60 years, starting at 8:00 p.m. eastern with president ronald reagan's 1981 address, bill clinton in
and with disastrous consequences. should the party of lincoln embrace a path to citizenship so that all persons in our society can earn the right to pursue the american dream? i hope so. should the party of jefferson and our first african american president agreed to a bill that sanctions into law a permit state underclass? i would hope not. there will be a temptation to compromise on this issue and provide the undocumented less than full rights, we must resist this temptation. we will give them a chance to earn the right to become americans. it is the american way. second, the bishops will fight to preserve and enhance family unity as a cornerstone of our national immigration system. this has served to the nation over the past 200 years as immigrant families have helped build our nation. we must not forsake the family in this debate, mothers, fathers, and children, preserving family reunification in and promoting economic growth through our economic system are complementary and not competing goals. finally, we will fight to preserve the right of both u.s. and foreign-born workers in this debate. we w
have been down that road before and with disastrous consequences. should the party of lincoln embrace a path to citizenship so that all persons in our society can earn the right to pursue the american dream? i hope so. should the party of jefferson and our first african american president agreed to a bill that sanctions into law a permit state underclass? i would hope not. there will be a temptation to compromise on this issue and provide the undocumented less than full rights, we must resist this temptation. we will give them a chance to earn the right to become americans. it is the american way. second,second, the bishops willt to preserve and enhance family unity as a cornerstone of our national immigration system. this has served to the nation over theas
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)

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